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DecoratingDIYholidays

Two Dramatic Blue Accents For Your Thanksgiving Table

by Caitlin Kelch

We’ve seen deep blues make their mark on the home style palette since last fall, and, as we move towards the holiday season, I’ve been longing to make some handmade accents for our table. My best friend from NYC is making the trek to sweet, old West Virginia with her family and I’m hoping to squeeze in some craft time with her two children and my daughter.

These two DIYs make a beautiful and custom final product, both in glorious shades of blue. The DIY materials for each are under $15 and kid-friendly. Here’s to bringing some blue to the table this Thanksgiving! –Caitlin

Image above courtesy of The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Cyanotype by Hippolyte Bayard (French, 1801 – 1887) – [Arrangement of Specimens], about 1842

Sun prints always look lovely and with fall leaves pretty much everywhere, they’re definitely the motif of choice this time of year. are inexpensive (under $12) and perfectly suited for kids to get in on the action. If you’re having a larger gathering and get into a too-may-cooks situation, this is an easy task for an adult or two to take a walk outside with the young ones to collect leaves to print. Even an older child can lead the gang.

Once the prints are ready to go, create place cards with them and place them around the table for a touch of nature in blue and white tones.

See the full how-to here.

Textile and pattern designer has brought endless bespoke designs to homes all over, and these shibori napkins can grace your holiday table for years to come. Rebecca’s instructions are simple and the indigo dyeing kit is under $15.

Using thrifted napkins or inexpensive cotton towels like these, this project can be an inexpensive way to get outside with some buckets to create a keepsake you and your guests will remember fondly in the years to come.

See Rebecca’s full instructions for folding your napkins before you dye here, and follow the directions on your dye kit. that we recommend.

For a quick overview of four types of shibori designs (and how to create them), see ‘s post here!

 

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