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An Uncompromising Maximalist Home in Culver City, CA

by Garrett Fleming

An Uncompromising Maximalist Home in Culver City, CA, Design*Droits-Humains

While Instagram and Pinterest serve up some seriously stellar inspiration, over the years a few homeowners have told us about a less-savory side effect of using those platforms. For some, keeping up with the perfect spaces they see in their feeds leaves them in a rut, doubting their decor choices every step of the way. Admittedly, I’m right there with them. Instead of trusting my gut, sometimes I ponder “Will others judge me for what I find beautiful? Is this as pretty as other homes I’ve seen? AHHHH!” It’s exhausting. But what if we took the motto “Dance like no one’s watching,” and really lived by it? What if we all decorated like no one’s watching? I bet our homes would look a lot more like  home in Culver City, CA.

With a wide spectrum of colors and plants galore, the 900-square-foot space she’s curated for her children and is a lesson in going for it. Instead of doing Instagram polls to decide on what colors to paint her walls or copying the latest trends, she’s done her own research and designed her home as she darn well pleases. “The perfect room doesn’t exist in the eyes of the world. Just in your own independent eyes,” she says. “Once I realized I couldn’t please everybody, I became a lot braver with my decor choices.”

The greatest example of her brazen dedication to zigging when others zag are the murals in her kitchen and living room. Inspired by artists and designers of the past, they’re as bold as they are captivating — as are the accessories that accompany them. She’s paired the pretty paintings with colorful decorations that nod to her Chilean upbringing, and the two come together in a riot of personality to create a home that’s one of a kind. Scroll down to check it out, and enjoy! —

Photography by Mila Moraga-Holz

Image above: Mila recently renovated her kitchen as a part of Instagram’s “One Room Challenge.” The room’s showpiece is this mural in the breakfast nook. The look – which Mila painted herself – was inspired by one of her favorite artists, Surrealist .

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Mila cleverly used IKEA cabinets to create a corner bench in the new breakfast nook.

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Mila’s bold Maximalism is informed by her Chilean upbringing. She’ll soon be infusing her own brand of home goods with the eye-catching style.

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The goal of the kitchen revamp was to warm up the space a bit. Pairing a Benjamin Moore hue inspired by Farrow & Ball “Radicchio” with the original wooden countertops was a perfect solution.

Color and design influences people’s moods and energy levels. It can make you feel inspired and full of life if you let it.

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A pink piece by Mila as well as estate sale finds decorate the entryway. Mila says, “My favorite art piece in this hallway is the ceramic plate from … I like to search for local artists that create unique and wonderful art. Katy Krantz is my newest find, and I can’t get enough of her ceramics.”

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You can see the hallway from every room in the house, so Mila took the time to hunt down a bright and fun wallpaper that would stand out. In the end, this Matisse-inspired one from won.

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“What I love about our home is that it makes people happy.” – Mila Moraga-Holz

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The bathroom is a calming breath of fresh air in a whirlwind of pattern and color.

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Plants – 120 to be exact – fill every corner of Mila’s home. “When you are not pleased with how a room looks, just fill it up with plants. No room looks bad with lots of plants in it,” she advises.

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The cornerstone of Mila and George’s home is this hand-painted mural inspired by the landscape work of  and the home of .

I don’t dwell in self-doubt. Why? Because I have realized with time that… some people are going to like it and some people are going to hate it.

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Besides how happy her home makes other people feel, Mila is also grateful for her house’s petite size. She says, “I know it’s kind of [hard to believe], but raising children in a small home gives you an intimacy that I wasn’t expecting. We always know what the other members of the family are up to.”

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The piano in the living room is a thrift store find, and the family uses it “constantly.” Atop it sit two paintings Mila inherited from her parents. “I like the unusual contrast between the boho and colorful pieces in the living room and these elegant and solemn paintings,” she says.

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The kids’ room was the first makeover Mila ever attempted. The Hygge & West wallpaper was the catalyst for every decision she made regarding the space.

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Living in a smaller home means living with less storage. Open-shelving options like this one have proven to be vital, especially since Mila and George are contending with an abundance of toys and children’s books.

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This IKEA dresser was originally rather plain, but Mila gave it a new spin by adding the corner brackets and drawer pulls.

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The 1940s, two-bedroom, one-bath home’s floor plan.

SOURCE LIST

Kitchen
Cabinetry paint – Benjamin Moore custom color inspired by Farrow & Ball “Radicchio”
Wall paint – Benjamin Moore “Springtime Peach”
Hardware – CB2
Chandelier – vintage
Chandelier wall mount – Wayfair
Pillows – Target, Ximena Rozo Designs

Hallway
Wallpaper – Kate Zaremba
Light – IKEA
Art – Katy Krantz, Mila Moraga-Holz
Bench legs – Pretty Pegs

Living Room
Shelving – The Home Depot
Hanging lamp, rug – Ximena Rozo Designs
Sofa – Article
Select artwork – Jason Monet

Kids’ Room
Wallpaper – Hygge & West

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Comments

  • Love this colorful and beautifully maximized space! And I’ll second the joy of raising kids in small houses. Being on top of each other when everyone is home and awake (THANK GOD children have to sleep and go to school) really does build those relationships brick by brick. Also the amount of mess kids can make is in direct correlation to how much space they have, so smaller house means smaller messes, which for me is pretty much the definition of joy. ;)

  • I adore those abstract print walls! Such a great post for interior inspiration – thank you so much for sharing!

    Sending you good vibes!

    Nati x @naticreates

  • The use of color and graphic design in this wonderful house is inspiring. I, too, raised my kids in a small house, and agree with those comments. Thanks for letting us have a look around.

  • The quotes in between are really inspiring. It is good to live & decorate your home on your own terms, choices and taste. Because few people like it, love it and there are people who might be of different taste. Each person is different in their own way. Great article!

  • Oh my goodness, I’m just looking at this now! How wonderful! Love the colours, textures, cheerfulness – everything! Thank you for posting such a vibrant space!

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