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Hanukkah 2018: Menorahs, Hanukiahs, Mezuzahs & More

by Grace Bonney

I’ve been blogging here at Design*Droits-Humains for over 14 years, and one of the things I’ve been most thankful for is the feedback, advice and education we’ve received from readers. Whether it’s advice on how to better understand a design style’s history and impact or deeper information on the cultural meaning and significance of an object, we have been so fortunate to have frequent and personal feedback in the form of emails, comments and DMs. It was through comments here that I learned what I knew of as a menorah is actually called a . A menorah has seven branches, while a hanukiah has eight — with one candle offset in some way. While most shops call all of these menorahs, I’m thankful to our community of Jewish readers here who’ve consistently (and compassionately) schooled me on terminology and significance.

While we’ll include both terms here (because most people will search for these under the name “menorah”), I wanted to note that there is a difference between these terms regarding design and meaning. Today we are rounding up not just hanukiahs, but also mezuzahs, cards, dreidels and other designs that celebrate Hanukkah or Judaism. I hope you’ll find something perfect for celebrating the holiday in your home or perhaps gifting for someone in your life that celebrates Hanukkah. Hanukkah Sameach! xo, Grace

Image above, clockwise from top left:  $5, Hanukiah $295, $148+, $149.99, $3.50, $16, $100 (Signed out-of-stock styles, unspeckled, ), $128,  $149.99, $80, $195, $95, $9.95

 

Image above, clockwise from top left: $170, $10, $98, $95, $195, $295, $60, $196, $5, $180

Image above: $68

Image above: $275

Image above: (labeled “Candelabra” on the site) $50

Image above: $40

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Comments

  • Wow – you learn something new everyday! As a lifelong practicing Jew, I have never once heard the word Hanukiah for Menorah. In fact, as I was looking at your item descriptions before reading the content I thought you had a serious repeated misspelling – joke’s on me :)

    • You are not the only one, Melissa. Last year we went to outdoor Hasidic lighting of Menorah and I don’t remember them using the term. Live and learn. Have a happy happy Hanukah.

  • I’m 49 years old and Jewish and grew up using the term menorah. It’s used in song after song. I’m going to keep on using it, and you can, too.

  • This is a lovely round-up, and it is always so nice to see other religions and cultures included in the blog-o-sphere!
    Maybe it has something to do with where one grows up, but as a 35 year old Jew from south Florida, the term Hanukiah is not unfamiliar to me.

    But a little more schooling for you Grace….mezuzahs are not a Hanukkah thing! They are simply a vessel to hold the Jewish blessing over one’s house, and have nothing to do with Hanukkah.

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