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Good Company Issue #3 is HERE + Giveaway!

by Kelli Kehler

We are THRILLED to announce that , is officially out in the world! Inside this issue you’ll find feature interviews with Aparna Nancherla, Ashley Nicole Black, Maria Bamford, Maria Hinojosa, Quinta Brunson, Christian Siriano and so many more. We also have an entire section devoted to practical how-to and 101 guides to financial topics like: financial planning for entrepreneurs and freelancers, how to know your worth, how to negotiate salary and raises, saving for retirement, and how to find YOUR own version of financial freedom.

This is without a doubt our best issue yet and we are so proud of what our team of 65+ contributors has created. If you’re wishing you had more guidance in the financial realm of your job/career/future creative endeavors, this is a .

To order a copy of Good Company and support over 65 writers, artists, makers and creatives in each issue, click , or see what indie bookstores near you are selling it by clicking .

We are also very excited that our publisher, Artisan, is giving away all THREE of our Good Company issues and a tote bag to 10 lucky readers! For a chance to win, choose ONE of these options for entry:

  • Comment on this blog post below what your biggest money fear or victory is.
  • Comment your biggest money fear or victory and tag a friend in the same comment on the designated giveaway post at @
  • Comment your biggest money fear or victory and tag a friend in the same comment on the designated giveaway post at @
  • Comment your biggest money fear or victory and tag a friend in the same comment on the designated giveaway post at @

Artisan will choose 10 total winners, at random, across all four places of entry (this blog post, Good Company’s Instagram feed, Design*Droits-Humains’s Instagram feed, and Artisan’s Instagram feed).

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Open to US residents of the 48 Continental United States, age 18 years as of May 14, 2019. Sweepstakes begins at 03:30 a.m. Eastern Time (ET) and ends on 5/18/19 at 11:59 PM EST. Visit official rules . Void where prohibited.

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Comments

  • biggest money triumph – keeping the same lifestyle despite see raises in income. also, not giving my kids everything we can afford to give them. they could have more, but they need to know moderation and patience.

  • I grew up without money. I wanted to grow up and never have to have my electricity turned off, to not have to use the oven for heat, to always have food, to have a reliable vehicle, to have money in the bank for emergencies. While I’ve been able to reach a financial level that allows me a stable living condition, I live in fear of losing my income. I am also a recovering alcoholic and I recognize some addictive tendencies in my relationship with money that I am currently trying to sort out. I have money coming in, but I am so eager to spend it. If money is sitting in my bank account I am often thinking about using it (like a drug). So, my big fear is self-sabotage. That I had the opportunities to create money-safety, and I blew it.

  • I generally feel pretty good about finances (we have little debt and live within our means), but planning for retirement practically hives me hives!

  • I grew up in poverty, and even though I’ve been mostly financially stable for the better part of 20 years, I’m still delighted to be able to pay all my bills on time every month.

  • My biggest money victory is buying my first home (a year ago) in a major city at the age of 22! I saved nearly everything from my first job out of college and while I did graduate with a lot of student loans, I managed to save enough for a down payment on my first home and pay off half of my student loan debt. With a lot of strategic decision making and some penny-pinching, home buying is possible for millennials .

  • My biggest money victory was successfully saving up to be able to put a full 20% down payment on a home in the (sadly expensive) area that my spouse and I live in. It took us nearly 10 years but we did it, and it’s a cute little mid-century 3 br on a hill. Now, furnishing and decorating it has been slow–we’ve had to rebuild our savings–but I love my house and I’m so happy to come home to it.

    My biggest money fear is long-term savings and trying to be prepared “just in case”. My husband and I both have medical conditions that could flare up and impact our ability to work, and thus our income. If one of us lost our job, we’d be in trouble. So, that’s my big worry.

  • My biggest fear would be that I will always be paycheck to paycheck and I won’t have any creative bandwidth or resources to make a difference in film and storytelling. I want to make things but I don’t want to risk having no security because no one in my family ever had as a home base.

  • I’m a freelancer. My biggest fear is that my clients vanish overnight and I’ll have no source of income.

  • My biggest money fear is leaving a well-paying job doing a career that I don’t care about for a career in the arts that I’m passionate about. Trading financial stability and safety for a path that I would likely be happier in.

  • Biggest money victory would be finally getting my spouse on board with my method of paying bills and saving. He would pay his portion of our bills out of his paycheck on the 1st and then limp his way to the middle of the month with minimal money in his account. He’s now splitting bills throughout the month which has resulted in him using his credit card much less between the 1st and 15th of the month for groceries, kid stuff, etc. We also use the Digit app to help us squirrel away cash that we would otherwise spend on small mindless purchases.

  • My biggest money victory is being able to work from home while being a single stay at home mom. Being able to be there for my kids while making enough to provide what we need is very satisfying!!

  • my biggest financial fear is fear is not being able to clothe and feed our two children. We are self employed and have ridden the waves of our web development company s success verses down times for over a decade (which is my biggest finical triumph!) Being self employed also meant that when our children were little we never had to send them to day care, we could juggle our work loads between us so that one of us was also working or enjoying the baby’s. Family time and memories we appreciate forever. When its good its so good, i wouldn’t want any other life or reality. But the web is an ever evolving animal and to ride its waves you have to constantly adapt, which is in itself another full time job. Your living pay check to pay check but their is no certainty that check will ever arrive…. The stress that causes is very dark.

  • My biggest fear is that some major event, i.e., illness, will drain my bank account and all of our savings. Even though I know we’ve prepared for it, hard to know what’s in store and predict anything. Looking at college tuition several years down the line is a source of stress also; they’ve doubled since I went to college and always worry about how we will be able to help our kids manage. Biggest victory is saving up for a house in the area we wanted, and earning a low interest rate due to great credit ratings.

  • We just had several money sinks (e.g., root canal, cat with cancer, car problems, etc.) recently so I’m feeling a bit battered at the moment. I’m a careful saver but I’m always a little afraid of what might be coming next. Sadly, “fun” items like vacations always fall to the bottom of my priority list. I need to start designating a portion of savings for fun things too.

  • Living in the Bay Area and working in non-tech roles, I’ve often been pigeon-holed into low paid production jobs at tech companies as a contractor–my fear is always the lack of financial stability I have as a temp. worker.

  • My biggest money victory is landing my dream job — with a 30% raise over my previous salary to boot. I had a target salary range in mind, and their offer came in at $1,000 than my top number. It was incredibly validating and exciting.

  • Feels somewhat silly to say (I guess because of how likely it is to happen), but my biggest money fear is having to work full-time for the rest of my life in order to pay the bills, as opposed to having the freedom of a part-time/flexible schedule that would allow me more time to make art and start a family and actually spend time with said family.

  • My biggest fear is that we’re not saving enough for retirement. Our biggest victory is that we’ll be free of credit card debt in October of this year!

  • One of both: figuring out how and that I actually could support myself after a terrible breakup was a huge personal victory. And, the fear of not being able to afford basic health care under our current system terrifies me.

  • My greatest and most recent money victory is officially starting my retirement fund and opening a line of credit to help get rid of my credit card debt. Growing up my mom always instilled the importance of income and made sure that I understood what the cost of a comfortable lifestyle is, and so I’ve always had that thought in the back of my mind. I’m currently trying to develop my investing knowledge and start building a portfolio, but those are some very murky waters!

  • Oh my gosh, that’s easy: my biggest financial fear is not being able to afford healthcare for myself and my partner— we both have chronic health issues and it’s really hard knowing how much we rely on insurance providers who do not have our health in mind

  • Biggest money triumph: Despite starting out as a young single mom, learning money matters from smart women in my life (grandmas, friends) who manage their household finances and taught me to work hard, save a percentage of my income every month, allocate for insurances and pensions, and make choices (cycling as transport!) that support living within my means. I’ve raised my daughter to value creativity, sustainability, and personal connection rather than material acquisitions.

  • I’ve already had one medical bankruptcy due to chronic illnesses. I’m constantly in fear that I’ll have another, especially with health insurance premiums rising to unaffordable levels. The United States must fix their healthcare system.

  • One of my biggest money fears is anytime negotiations around pay/salary are required – it is always such an uncomfortable conversation. It really shouldn’t be, but for whatever reason, asking for more always makes me feel gross.

  • My biggest money fear is starting my own business! My goal is to really narrow down who I am and what I love and how I can share some of that with other people— but I hate selling myself! I need to find a way to be more self-sufficient soon as my close future goal is to buy my first house. All scary and exciting things!

  • My biggest money fear is losing my health insurance, especially right before or during an injury. Yes, there is Medicaid, Obamacare, COBRA, etc. BUT the first option isn’t always possible and the last two are expensive to VERY expensive. I just hope coverage for those of us with pre-existing conditions remains a guarantee: let’s face it, who doesn’t have some pre-existing condition of some sort as they reach middle age?!

    I recently broke my foot and nearly lost my trusty employer health insurance of 12 years at the same time. Fortunately, things worked out but, even with important improvements these past few years, life without health insurance and/or medical bankruptcy is very real in the US, unfortunately. And, for those of us with chronic conditions, life without healthcare can become deadly!

  • My biggest money fear is that I will never allow myself to enjoy the money I’ve saved (by taking a year off from working full time to travel, working part time, moving to a lower paying job I’m passionate about, etc.) and I’ll stay working full time for a large corporation forever just for the financial security.

  • Biggest $ fear is that I’m not more educated and aware of my finances, particularly when I’m retired or elderly. Definitely need more guidance on wise money choices to save for the future.

  • My biggest money fear is around health care. I have insurance, but what if I get sick and can’t afford treatment?

  • I love my job owning my own interior design business but I always live in fear that as a luxury business my job will disappear. Savings for college for my kids and retirement for my husband and I makes me sick, literally. No matter what we do it will be impossible to save what is needed.

  • Biggest victory: it’s taken three years, a job for my husband (after a move) and two raises for me, but we’re nearly done paying off all credit card debt accumulated after the move to a new city went (very) badly. We’ve had other bumps in the road (eg, flooded basement, sick pets, dental work) that slowed our progress, but we’re nearly there.

    Anyone who says people with debt are lazy or irresponsible are not only wrong but also cruel.

  • Biggest triumph- being debt free!
    Biggest fear- not having enough money to take care of my children and all of the”what-ifs” in life

  • My biggest money triumph is realizing that it is not only possible but necessary to build a personal relationship with money separate from what the world, your community, and your upbringing has taught you.

  • My biggest money victory so far has been paying off $80k in student loan debt in 4 years! My husband and I got serious, cut back our spending and lived on one salary in a closet of an apartment so we could direct our $$$ to getting the monkey off our backs!

  • My biggest money fear: a major health-care disaster that wipes out our savings (when o when will we get universal health care???)
    My biggest money triumph: That we actually *have* an emergency fund to slightly cushion my worst fear. Knowing health costs though, it would only be a drop in the bucket if cancer or a major accident hit. *sigh*

  • My biggest money fear or more like anxiety is when I invoice for my work. I somehow flip flop between wondering if the client will think I am too expensive/overcharging (the whole “I am a fraud / Not worth it” mentality) to if I am charging my worth, and making sure that I getting paid my worth, especially as a female consultant. I tend to be a little late in sending my invoices because of this anxiety.

  • As an only child, my biggest money fear is whether there are unexpected health costs for my parents when they are older. It’s tough to talk about and bring up, especially within Asian culture, but I’ve been preparing for it and trying!

  • My biggest money fear is not to be able to return to my country of origin as per my original plan to set up the school for low income children in memory of my mother. I manage to save up some money but something always comes up and squirrels my savings away. I live within my means and all that but something always comes up. I i’m determined though so I dust myself up and start over again.

  • Biggest money fear: student loans (probably will be paying them during retirement – ugh) and I’m planning to retire in 5 years. Anxiety about money has always been with me, even though I’ve worked since I was 16, up to 3 jobs at a time. Children and ex-husbands are expensive!

  • Paying off my student loans!! When I graduated that bill seems like it would outlive me so finally paying it off was a great victory.

  • My biggest money victory was to stop being so afraid of not having it and stop letting it control me. And to learn to bend my frugal ways (sometimes) and spend out a little.

  • My biggest money fear is that I’ll revert back to my eating disorder days and starve myself of the worthiness to spend money. Not just on food but on anything and everything. Fear that I’ll convince myself that I don’t deserve to use money for anything beyond rent and the basics. I fear that money will own me. Will control me.

  • My biggest money fears are:
    -my spouse dying and me not being able to find work to support our kids
    -my mom or in-laws getting old and/or sick and not being able to afford to care for them where they would like/need to live
    -losing insurance coverage and having a major expense that bankrupts us and destroys our marriage/family

  • My biggest money fear is losing our house somehow. We’re new home owners and I have dreams about accidentally not paying the mortgage for months.

  • My biggest money fear is that I am on my own for the first time and I don’t want to start bad habits that follow me forever. It’s stressful learning what to save for and how to do it properly, while still having enough for bills and pocket change.

  • My biggest money fear is my students loans. I’m paying them back using the Income Based Repayment program and if that ever went away for some reason I’m not sure what I would do.

  • My biggest money victory is hitting my saving goal for my (future) wedding. I’m not engaged yet, but I would like to be married at some point and figured I might as well start saving now.

  • My biggest financial triumph: eliminating my student debt. My biggest fear: finding myself in a position where I have to decide if I’ll drain my savings or go into debt.

  • My husband and I own our own business and it’s just the two of us riding the wave. I fear a long term health crisis that limits our income and brings tremendous costs, yikes!

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